Grand Lake Stream

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Town News

Dave McCullough

 

The Grand Lake Stream Snowmobile Club grooms and maintains miles of snowmobile trails for the purpose of hunting, fishing, or just riding Maine’s trails. I just talked with Eric Mauricette and he was part of a team that did trail grooming and brushing over the weekend. Farm Cove trail has been groomed and brushed as well as other trails. This is a great time to include a trip to Grand Lake Stream as part of your trail ridding this winter. The Pine Tree Store is open 7 to 7 everyday with gas, food and other services available for those who seek an adventure.

Skiing and Snowshoeing at Musquash Esker. Friday, January 20, 2017 - 1:00 PM to 3:30 PM

Traversing the frozen woodlands of Downeast Maine by cross-country ski or snowshoe is a great way to enjoy a winter afternoon.  On Friday, January 20th, join DLLT Education and Outreach Manager Colin Brown for a group trek along a unique glacial feature, Musquash Esker, located in the Downeast Lakes Community Forest.  Interested participants must bring their own skis or snowshoes and warm clothing.  We will meet at the Downeast Lakes Land Trust office in Grand Lake Stream, and then caravan out to the trailhead.  For more information, please contact DLLT at (207) 796 – 2100 or email cbrown@downeastlakes.org.

Thoughts to think about. Your grandmother was right when she said eat your vegetables!  A sliced carrot looks just like the human eye. When you glance in the mirror the pupil, iris and radiating lines do look just like the eye.  Science is now proving that carrots greatly enhance the blood flow and function of our eyes. 

GRAND LAKE SNOWMOBILE CLUB MEETING MINUTES

Our snowmobile grooming machines have been out twice.  Once as a test run. The second time on a trail cutting mission. On the way back to the barn, we found another trail that need’s serious cutting. It’s probably a never ending cycle for all the clubs.

Brittany and Josh are in charge of our club website, www.grandlakesnowmobileclub.com. All our latest news, a trail map, and 75 miles of trail conditions will be on it. It will be updated weekly.

We will be having snowmobile events with the Downeast Lakes Land Trust, during the Maine Outdoor Weekend. We will have trail touring, and trips to Jack’s Snack Shack. This restaurant in the woods is great and at least a 2.5 to 3 hour trip, one way. The dates are February 3, and 4. All is at planning stage at the moment. 

Part of the Amazon Trail, leading to GLS is being logged. It will be dangerous to travel, probably until March.   The SnoMo Café will be open on Saturday’s, 11:00 to 2:00, starting Jan 7th. Planned Specials: baked goods, and hot beverages. A bathroom is available.

The Pine Tree Store is open 7:00 to 7:00, every day, and has a wide menu, supplies, equipment, gifts and plenty of gasoline. They can also find you help if needed. Call 796-5027. Les, our new Trail Master and Brinda, are the store owners. New trail maps are available at the store for $5. Please try our trails and make our friendly little town a stop on your snowmobile travels.

mikeremillard@mgemaine.com, Reporter


MEMORIES OF REFORM SCHOOL from the Hermit: Most all folks recall their first full-time job.  Mine was rich in responsibilities - challenges and rewards – not much money – on my own – first time away from home. I had just graduated from college and was hired by the Mass. Division of Fish and Wildlife as a technician. I was assigned to the central division located in Westborough just east of Worchester.  Week one I was called into the supervisor’s office and given my first solo assignment:  two days a week, all summer, I was to report to the Lyman School for Boys.  This was the State’s only reform school.  It housed some 100 of the toughest repeat criminal juvenile offenders. Behind the school’s complex was a 75 acre section containing fields, woods and a small pond. It had been turned into a public hunting preserve for pheasant and cotton-tailed rabbits.  Some of the fields were planted with buckwheat for the pheasant and others left to hay for the game farm.  Walls and boundaries were planted with multi-floral rose bushes which created large patches of green brier-cover for the birds and rabbits.  Talk about panic!  I was required to take out two dozen hard core delinquents and carry-out work projects in the fields and woods.  I wasn’t much older than my charges. Clueless as to how to proceed I don’t recall what I said to them but I survived the week.

My un-authorized routine was established giving the boys a 15 minute break every 2 hours. I passed out forbidden cigarettes once a day.  If the day was problem-free I took them swimming in the pond.  Out-of-sight against the rules I’m sure!  I made it a point to speak to each individual every day.  Most of them came from backgrounds to terrible to imagine. To survive they were forced to fend for themselves doing whatever it took.  I’m no bleeding heart liberal but I believe more than half were salvageable and could eventually become productive citizens.  The rest would probably graduate to Charlestown State Prison.  I took the opportunity to share my thoughts and opinions on any subject they wanted to discuss – listening as much as talking.  This experience would stand me in good stead when I became a teacher.  Thought for today:  Age is just a number.

Your Humble Correspondent, Dave McCullough 207-839-4205 or dmccull1@maine.rr.com